Public Service Announcement: A Guide to Kenyon Telephones

This is one call you don't want to answer. (bulletin.kenyon.edu)

Friends, we are now so fully enmeshed in the world of texting that we barely remember how to use our iPhones to make phone calls, let alone how to use a … landline. My eyes opened to this the other day, when a friend of mine expressed confusion about an RSVP number on a College invitation. “x5491? How do I call x5491?”* For those of you who don’t know, all Kenyon phone numbers begin with (740) 427-, and the x**** represents the last four of the number. When calling from a campus phone, simply dial the four-digit extension; when dialing from an off campus or cell phone, dial those four digits preceded by, again, (740) 427-.

More phone tips after the jump.
Campus phones are an underutilized resource: they’re a way to get in touch with an email-deficient professor without trying your luck at office hours, and, when combined with the stalker directory, can be used to track down any student — it’s almost like having everyone’s cell number! Except you have to hope they’re home, and that they’re not afraid to answer their room phone because they’ve never heard it ring before.
Campus phones also have specific ring patterns:
  • If your campus phone rings with a regular, even ring, the call is coming from another campus telephone.
  • If it rings with a “short, long” pattern, the call is coming from an outside line. (In my experience, generally from robot voices trying to sell you Caribbean cruises.)
  • If it rings even when disconnected from the wall, the call is coming from the Caples Ghost.

Finally, one more piece of advice: after memorizing (740) 427-, also memorize 43022. How do some of you not know your own zip code? It’s helpfully printed above the Post Office entrance.

*This extension belongs to the lovely Vicki Miller in the Academic Advising Office.

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