Kenyon Reveille: From the Beginning of Time

The Lords of 1895 with their star player, who appears to be a terrier.

The Lords of 1895, complete with what appears to be a terrier.

While the Reveille has mysterious origins, the earliest volume available in the admissions office is from 1895 — apparently the only yearbook left there to represent the 19th century. Reading it, I was happy to find that there really never has been a time when Kenyon wasn’t a bit weird.

The Kenyon Reveille's comfortable home, in a corner of Ransom Hall.

The Kenyon Reveille’s comfortable home, in a corner of Ransom Hall.

Though not in bad condition, this volume greeted me by ejecting its title page from its binding.

Though not in bad condition, this volume greeted me by ejecting its title page from its binding.

Each class had a page to itself indicating its class colors, class yell and officers.

Each class got a page, a color, and a yell to its name. The class of '97 also had an elected Prophet, Poet, and Toastmaster.

The class of ’97 also had an elected “Prophet,” “Poet” and “Toastmaster.”

To make up for a lack of photographs (which were expensive at the time), illustrations were submitted.

To make up for a lack of expensive photographs, illustrations were submitted, such as this one for the "Kenyonite Order of Holy Monks".

Such as this one for the “Kenyonite Order of Holy Monks.”

…One of a few clubs that has, one way or another, not survived to the present.

...One of a few clubs that has (perhaps by definition) not survived to the present.

“Suicide Club”

Such as the Raspberry Jam Club, bravely championed by Martin Myers '96.

The “Raspberry Jam Club,” bravely championed by Martin Myers ’96.

Or the Knights of Rest, despite an extra three honorary memberships.

The “Knights of Rest,” Honorary Members “SQEIWZHGTDWJX,” “BNBJHQRHBON” and “FFLEMXCWONTZ.”

Mandolin club was going strong, though.

Mandolin Club was going strong, though.

And a few organizations are still with us today.

And one organization is still with us today.

The Kenyon Collegian, Volume XX.

What I can only assume is an accurate portrayal of Greek life around the turn of the century.

What I can only assume is an accurate portrayal of Greek life around the turn of the century — or now, really.

A few contributions from the illustrator I was unable to comprehend, but still appreciated.

I was unable to comprehend a few contributions from the illustrator.

“As Others See Us — GRINDS”

Stay weird.

Stay weird.

One response

Share your thoughts on this post.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s