Blog off: Kornman ’22 v.s. Stedman ’20

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courtesy of RGBStock

We like to stay pretty competitive here at The Thrill, and a Blog Off is one way we can definitively prove that one of us is objectively a better blogger (dare we say, a better person). So we leave it to you, the reader, to decide in a blind taste test who is really better as we square off on various topics. Today, we have Rebecca Kornman ’22 and Kathleen Stedman ’20 revisit the age-old question RE: Which weekend is the proper Halloweekend? October 25th-27th or November 2nd-4th? Who will make the most compelling argument? Reader, only you can decide. 

Blogger A:

There comes a time when all things must end and so too must Halloween. It is understood by all rational thinkers that holiday seasons occupy the weeks leading up to the holiday itself. Once the holiday comes, a new season begins. Do we continue to dwell on baby Jesus on December 28th? No, by that time he is a full grown man. Do we attend red, white, and blue house parties with our questionable high school friends on July 7th? No, by that time we have abandoned all patriotism and returned to a dark, sunken, anarchic state of mind. So why should any post-Halloween party be celebrated, nay legitimized, for the sake of extending the Halloweekend?

November 1st symbolizes a transition into late fall culture. Pumpkins rot, leaves fall, the weather becomes too cold for to successfully execute that sexy Juul costume you’ve been planning with your roommate, the white man celebrates Thanksgiving (November 22 this year also known as the 55 year anniversary of the JFK assassination also known as my nineteenth birthday), and then Thanksgiving ends and Christmas season begins. Just because the Old K basement feels lawless (it’s not) doesn’t mean we should abandon all norms surrounding holiday celebration and, as a result, disrupt the course of all holidays for the rest of the year. October 1st-31st is a sacred time to celebrate the menacing darkness that occupies our minds at night and go to class dressed as a certain Will Schuster without question. Will I go out tonight? Yes. Will I crumble in the hand of the chaotic evil and crown this weekend the “better Halloweekend?” Never.

Blogger B:

You might question why an intellectual individual would enjoy the weekend after Halloween, seeing as the actual “holiday” itself has passed. I know, readers, it might not make sense at first. However, I implore you to see the merit and pregnant potential the weekend after Halloween promises, as well as the disappointment that the weekend before Halloween holds.

For one, the serotonin-infused rave that is the PEEPs Halloween all-campus occurs the weekend after, and that in itself is enough to give the weekend-after a proper head start on the weekend before. We all know the drill of an all-campus held in Old K’s basement; x’s on hands, warm Natty Light froth, and a sweaty bump-and-grind. But PEEPs parties are elevated from your typical all-campus, with two rooms of not one but TWO different styles of music that cater to the Kenyon kids. What can the weekend before offer? Wandering around NCAs, waiting for each party to be inevitably shut down by Campo or for them to play “Closing Time” by Semisonic? I’ll take a hard pass.

Additionally, the weekend after Halloween is when all the candy is ripe for the taking. Whether it be extra candy that’s left over from one of your professor’s houses or the discounted Halloween themed Reese’s and candy corn at Walmart, the candy is plentiful. How can you argue with that?

Lastly, the weekend after Halloween allows for reflection, as well as anticipation. We’re coming off the high that is Halloween, yet still have Thanksgiving to look forward to. The weekend before is coming off the high of…whatever holiday was most recently celebrated. Labor Day? Truly wild.

One response

  1. Blog A definitely represents the reality of celebrating, haunting and binging on Halloween. Anticipation is everything, but so is nepotism.
    Posted lovingly by Rebecca’s Grandmother.

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