Queer 101: Transphobia and Cis-Allyship Panel Summary

Queer 101 Image

Last Friday, ODEI and Unity House hosted a panel on Transphobia and Cis-Allyship in the wake of new legislation which threatens the legal and personal identity of trans people in America. The panel, hosted by co-leaders of Gender Group Micah Fisher ’21 (he/him) and Cat March (they/them), Teddy Hannah-Drullard ’20 (she/her or they/them), Professor Gilda Rodriguez (she/her), and ODEI’s Timothy Bussey (he/him) answered anonymously submitted questions having to do with resources for trans people and what cis people can do to be better allies.

Just in case you missed it, here are some of the questions answered by the panel.

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Queer 101: Transness, “Allyship,” and the Upcoming Panel

Queer 101 Image

Cw: transphobia, recent threats from the Department of Health and Human Services

Kenyon, I’m trans and I’m exhausted. I’m not the only one. If I were, I’d have quit by now. There’s a panel in Hayes 109 on Friday at 4 p.m., but there’s so much more to supporting trans students at Kenyon than going to one event. Come to the panel, listen, and ask yourselves how you can fully commit to supporting us. It’s important to show up for trans folx, but active allyship isn’t just about showing up. The keyword here is “active.” This kind of work involves effort. My co-conspirators and I are getting tired of doing activist work all on our own. The Friday panel on trans resources and allyship (in response to this bullshit) isn’t just a stand-alone affair. It’s an invitation. I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: do you want to learn how to make this community safer and more inclusive for everyone? Then bring a notebook because it’s time for the learning to begin. Continue reading

Queer 101: Deb Ball 2017

Queer 101: Deb Ball 2017

Cw: Discussions of transphobia

Hey, Kenyon. I haven’t done one of these in a while but I feel like this Saturday is bringing about a topic we very much need to discuss on this campus. Namely, respecting trans and gender non-conforming students by being active and responsible allies instead of passive ones. The most important thing to remember in reading this article, whether you’re a fan of Deb Ball or not, is that allyship takes work. Allyship can be challenging. When your views and opinions are being challenged by a minority group who just wants you to hear them out, instead of shutting down and becoming defensive, you should listen. Our pain doesn’t come from sensitivity— it comes from history. It comes from real, tangible experiences and emotions. Your actions, even in the Kenyon bubble, do not occur in a vacuum. You are responsible for what you choose to pay attention to and what you choose to ignore. With that being said, I, as an openly nonbinary and queer student of Kenyon College, would like to discuss Deb Ball. Thank you in advance for keeping an open mind.

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Four Years of Walking By: A Response to Kenyon Activism

cw: slurs

It happens every year. That’s what I tell first years when they look at me with wide-eyed confusion at the megaphones and the posters telling queer people they need Jesus and women that they need to be quiet. After four years you get used to it, but every year it hurts in different ways.

As a first year, I was hurt because I was newly out of the closet and there were some people trying to force me back in. Now I’m angry and frustrated for an entirely different reason. I want to talk about performative allyship, and how here at Kenyon, it’s something of a disease.

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The Buddy System: Crozier’s Got Your Back!

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ALWAYS! ~via kommandasanda.deviantart.com

Hey, Kenyon! In light of recent events, a lot of students have expressed feelings of fear and discomfort traveling into Mount Vernon/the Knox County area alone, as well as walking around campus at night. Crozier got wind of this and has decided to set up a Buddy System! Their goal is to ensure the safety and comfort of anyone who might feel uncomfortable going places by themselves. In other words, they’re going to make sure we all have someone to swim with if need be! Thanks, Crozier!

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