Kenyon Sartorialist: No-Stress February Fashion

Kenyon Sartorialist Charlotte Greene ’14 is back behind the camera, and she’s generously allowed us to share her stunning shots here on The Thrill. Read on for a glimpse of some of the sweetest styles Kenyon kids have to offer. 

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I love how regal and mature Patience looks. Her scarf is a refreshing sight amidst the usual winter pile-up of wool (not that I don’t love the art of layering, but it can sometimes be hard to break from the habit). I’ve noticed also a lot of girls wearing work boots, which is totally rad.

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The Purinton Primer: The Actor’s Exam

Originally, I was planning to make this week’s post a reflection on the teachings of Konstantin Stanislavski. It would have been a look at the merits and demerits of his approaches to acting and a commentary on the writing style through which he chooses to convey these ideas. And yes, it would have been hilarious.

Konstantin, you party animal.

Unfortunately, you’re going to have to wait until my next post to read this fascinating material. I hope you’re excited.

The reason that post will have to wait is that, like most of you, I am focused on my workload over finals week, and I have a lot of work this week. (My last final is tomorrow at 9:30 a.m.) In no way does this make me unique. The campus is abuzz with studious and stressed students. What does make me a bit more unusual is that this is one of my first final weeks where I’ve actually felt that I had a lot of work.

I’ll pause so you can give me the finger.

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New England Grunge: Finals Push

For many of you, it is quickly becoming apparent that finals are right around the proverbial corner.  For the rest of you, consider this your fair warning.  A year ago, I was totally stressing out about the first finals round of my college career.  This, I thought, would be it. The jig would be up. I would be discovered for the fraud I was.  Game over. I’ve skated by for 19 years and finally people would figure it out: I am not ‘college material.’ Well, boy, did I prove them wrong … just kidding, I skated by for another whole year.  Lucky for you all, I am bringing my personal touch to finals week with my favorite thing: free bookstore coffee music (duh, it’s a music column).  My personal savior, the auditory bliss that is the music that fuels finals success … a play in three acts.

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The Purinton Primer: The Ballad of Francisco

Actors are notoriously proud people. This isn’t criticism, simply fact. Once an actor is cast in a certain role, he’ll convince himself that it’s the most important one in the play.

Pictured: 12 leading roles.

This belief is never mean-spirited or a question of one actor being superior to another — the ensemble is the most important thing to an actor. It just naturally occurs. We become defensive of our roles, and our insistence that our role is most important is simply a manifestation of the confidence with which we approach our work. Continue reading

This Week’s Kenyon Throwback: The Grab N’ Go, May It Rest in Peace

Hello, whippersnappers and fellow upperclassmen, and welcome to the first ever Kenyon Throwback.  For some of you, this will be like a stroll down memory lane; for others, a dusty piece of Kenyon lore; and for a few (I’m looking at you, young’uns), about as relevant as cassette tapes and floppy discs.  This week’s throwback is for the seniors out there, but rest assured, there will be many a post for students of all years to get the warm and fuzzies about.

Sometimes convenience is better than quality.  This was the unofficial slogan of the now defunct “Grab N’ Go,” a North Campus dweller’s answer to laziness the winter months when Peirce and Middle Ground were just too far to be worth the walk.  Now a lounge and study space, the Grab N’ Go was an underground haven in the depths of Gunderworld.  Now it resides in the seniors’ faint memories of freshman year along with the Milks.  It was great for those days when I felt like holing up in my Lewis dorm room rather than trekking to the socially vibrant Peirce.  For those of you who wanted three PB&Js but were discouraged by the finicky process of spreading six slices of bread with peanut butter and jelly (bread can be such a hassle) and crossing the servery 10 times between the jelly and peanut butter stations, the Grab N’ Go had your back.  Want three turkey wraps?  Go for it.  Hell, take another while you’re at it.  That wrap isn’t going bad anytime soon, may as well stock up.

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The Purinton Primer: Best Musicals, Part III

In my two most recent posts (which you can read here and here), I examined what I felt were the best musicals ever written. But while the musicals on those lists were highly celebrated and accepted into the musical theatre canon, there are an infinite number of fantastic shows that most of us have never heard of. That’s what this list celebrates. The underdogs. The little shows that could. The fantastic musicals filled with catchy songs, great characters, clever lyrics and wonderful stories that simply can’t catch a break. Until now. Until one blogger brought them to national attention and they became breakout hits.

Anyway, here they are: my list of the best musicals that most people haven’t heard of. Be sure to share your own favorite obscure shows in the comments section! Continue reading

New England Grunge: Seeing/Knowing

This past weekend, some friends and I decided we needed to get off-campus for at least a little while.  This plan turned into a full fledged hipster-hajj to New York City to see Jeff Mangum, the storied lead guitarist for Neutral Milk Hotel, play in Jersey City.  Where would a couple of broke college students stay in New York, though, some might ask? Well, thanks to The Thrill and my budding friendship with Thrill Editor David McCabe ’14, we had a place to stay. Staying at a person’s house is an intimate experience that sheds light on the person’s character as well as the environment that shaped him.  To peek into someone else’s life can feel invasive sometimes, and thus we often tread lightly.  But for the sake of public interest, I now present you with a look into the mind of the man behind the beloved Thrill.

I present:

Seeing/Knowing: David McCabe (Annotated)

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