Peirce Hack: Just Don’t Go

 

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A brief slice of food for thought. Next time you’re about to enter Peirce thinking about what mystery meat is on the table today or what vegetable-that’s-not-a-vegetable (I’m looking at you corn) is gonna be up for grabs this time, might I suggest taking a step back, doing a 180, and hightailing it to the nearest, I don’t know, Pop-Eyes or whatever.

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Here’s What Happened to the Speed Bumps Outside Peirce

Walking into Peirce the first week after break, something felt off. Something had changed, but what was it? Throughout dinner that night, no one said a word, too preoccupied with the cause of this malaise– the sudden disappearance of the speed bumps that once surrounded Peirce. So what happened to them? As Kenyon’s top investigative journal since 1824, The Thrill strives to enlighten the student body with the truth, so we were on the case to solve this mystery.

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Things I Realized Over Winter Break Are Only Socially Acceptable at Kenyon

I’ve had a hunch for a while that I’ve slowly developed a mild version of Stockholm Syndrome with Kenyon College. It comes on slowly, starting with a positive sentiment towards living in a one-and-a-half restaurant town. It finally becomes incurable with the onset of a nose ring infatuation and a sensation of terror because of the abundance of tampon options at the local Trader Joe’s. Since there are very few similarities between rural Ohio and Houston (besides the raging conservatives), I am reminded over breaks that there are a lot of things that are ONLY socially acceptable on Kenyon’s campus and are fully bizarre out in the real world:

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Artist Profile: Roxy Paine

Artist Profile: Roxy Paine

Whether you’ve seen a picture in an email or gone to Gund Gallery to see for yourself, if you’re on the college’s dislist, you know (at least a little bit) about Roxy Paine. The picture in the email shows a security checkpoint: a bin exiting an X-ray machine, the plastic strips that hang at the machine’s tail-end bending as the bin passes through them. But they are not actually plastic, and neither is the bin. Everything is made of wood. Maple to be exact, light in color and naturally stained. The contrast between the object a sculpture depicts and the material it’s made of is integral to Paine’s work.

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