The Monday Catchup

college-party.jpg

Ketchup dependence can start in high school and college. Please sauce responsibly.

It’s been a minute, hasn’t it? I don’t have much to say about this past weekend. It happened, and boy it felt like most other weekends. What a rush! Here’s what you had to say about various debaucherous escapades and keggers and the DJ at club Olin

I did lots of yelling this weekend. *yells*

It was a very good weekend for a variety of reasons

Continue reading

Advertisements

The Monday Catchup

ketchup.jpg

*sigh*

It’s the end. Every breath you take brings you a second further from Space Basses of the past, and every breath you give brings you a second closer to remembering if Mildred actually hooked up with your crush last night or if she just told you she did to make you jealous. To distract yourself from that backstabbing Mildred, here’s some other stories from this past weekend

This weekend was…um…intense

*Nervous laugh* I’m glad it’s over-for now.

Continue reading

Professors Who Went Here: Jonathan Tazewell ’84

The Thrill is pleased to introduce a new occasional feature: “Professors Who Went Here,” which features current Kenyon professors who also completed their undergraduate education on the Hill. This week we talked to Thomas S. Turgeon Professor of Drama, Jonathan Tazewell ’84. 

Professor Tazewell ’84. Via kenyon.edu

How has Kenyon changed since your undergraduate years?

I came to Kenyon as a first-year student in the fall of 1980. I was a legacy kid because my uncle had graduated from Kenyon in 1961. My parish priest had also gone to seminary at Bexley Hall when it was a part of Kenyon.
Kenyon has changed in many ways since I was a student, but what is most significant to me is that it is a more diverse and more liberal place than it was in the early ’80s. The population of students of color was less than 3%, and there were few non-white faculty members and no African American faculty. The families of students that I knew were mostly moderate to conservative in their political views, and that political point of view dominated the the campus.

Continue reading