Four Years of Walking By: A Response to Kenyon Activism

cw: slurs

It happens every year. That’s what I tell first years when they look at me with wide-eyed confusion at the megaphones and the posters telling queer people they need Jesus and women that they need to be quiet. After four years you get used to it, but every year it hurts in different ways.

As a first year, I was hurt because I was newly out of the closet and there were some people trying to force me back in. Now I’m angry and frustrated for an entirely different reason. I want to talk about performative allyship, and how here at Kenyon, it’s something of a disease.

Continue reading

Coming Out via Twitter, G-Chat, and the Kim K Game

via tumblr.com

via tumblr.com

There are many ways to come out to your friends and family.  Some of them involve sitting down and talking to your family.  However, that’s boring.  Why do that when you can either accidentally come out to people or come up with inventive ways to do so?

  • My favorite way that I’ve came out to someone was when I accidentally came out to my Grandma and Aunt on Twitter.  So, basically, I forgot that Twitter wasn’t just me shouting into the void and tweeted something about Hillary Clinton being the candidate who cared about LGBT equality and thus me.  A couple of days later, my Grandma replied to the tweet saying she loved me and supported me.  A couple of minutes after that, my Aunt texted me with a similar message.  I wasn’t sure how to respond and was kind of overwhelmed, so I didn’t respond to them right away.  When I did, I opened with, “This isn’t how I imagined coming out to the family, but…” Continue reading

10 o’clock list: 5 Ways to Come Out (If You Want!/If You Can!)

thank you, internet

Like we said, today is National Coming Out Day! Woohoo! Coming out can be an amazing experience, though for a lot of people, it may not be the best option. There is a wide variety of reasons why people do or don’t feel comfortable and secure coming out, and across the board, those reasons are real and valid. Even if you have the privilege of being able to come out without it affecting your safety or circumstances, it can be a really scary process, frequently one that takes your whole life time. Personally, four years ago, I thought I would never come out, two years ago I told my best friend in her Caples dingle, one year ago I told my mom in the car after a doctor’s appointment and this past Friday I came out to some of my newer friends during a stand-up open mic. Right now, I’m coming out to some people reading this. HEY, I’M QUEER. Cool.

If you feel like coming out is the move you want to make, that’s awesome! Here are some ideas:

  1. Up in the Clouds: Coming out is kind of a big deal, and sky-writing is big. Like the letters are so big. You can just take whoever you want on a walk and say, “Hey, what’s that over there?” and point at the sky-writing and then say, “Oh yeah, that’s about me.” Continue reading

My Parting Advice to You

Hanna Hall (three-quarter view, ca. 2005), Kenyon College

The Thrill is happy to feature narratives written by the Kenyon community. To submit a piece of writing, please look at our guidelines here. This submission is by an anonymous contributor. 

WARNING: This piece includes descriptions of self-harm, depression, bullying and suicide which may be triggering to some individuals.

The first time was an accident. I was at a chemistry review session the second week of sophomore year, and I didn’t even know I had been cut until I looked down and saw the blood on my arm. I waited for the pain, but the thing about this cut was that it didn’t hurt… it actually felt good. I had recently been diagnosed with depression, and I felt as though I were walking around with a ten pound weight on my chest, unable to speak, on the verge of crying at every moment. At that review session, looking at the blood, I realized that the weight had shifted just a little, and I took an easier breath than I had for the past month.

Continue reading

The Monday Catchup

The Underwoods made an appearance at Philander's Ball.

The Underwoods made an appearance at Philander’s Ball.

Good morning! Here’s what you missed while you were at high school prom Philander’s Ball:

The Lead Story: Season 2 of Netflix’s House of Cards came out early Friday morning. If you’re looking for hard news, there’s plenty after the jump. In the world of fake political drama, however, House of Cards gave viewers plenty to talk about. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, click here (not a spoiler). Here’s a recap of episode 1 “Hunt or be hunted.” Fans should also check out these slow-mo House of Card Instagram vids. Or this piece on why you should watch the original British version of the show. According Variety, at least 15% of Netflix subscribers watched the first episode on Friday. That’s a ton of people. Again, real news after the jump folks.

Continue reading

Do it tonight: God vs. Gays

Tonight at 7:00 p.m. in Philomathesian Hall (Ascension 220), the Discrimination Advisors are sponsoring a lecture by Central Ohio activist Tony Marconi, “God vs. Gays: The War That Never Was.” Marconi is both a member of the North Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Lewis Center and a long-time advocate and activist for LGBT rights, making him particularly qualified to give a lecture with such an alliterative, vaguely provocative title. He even helped to found Equality Ohio, an organization endorsed by Josh Radnor.

Unity House canceled its meeting to encourage more people to attend this event, so you basically have to go if you’re into this kind of thing. If you can’t make it for some reason, there will be a panel the next day featuring Marconi and religious studies professors Vernon Schubel, Royal Rhodes and Miriam Dean-Otting, at 4:00 p.m. in Philo.