Delahunty Suggests College Matching System

Jennifer Delahunty, via kenyon.edu

Critiquing the college admissions game in a piece for the New York Times, former Dean of admissions and current associate dean of West Coast admissions Jennifer Delahunty finds fault with the multi-billion dollar industry that has sprung up to help kids get into college.

From test prep to private college counselors and guidebooks, Delahunty proposes that this may not be the best way to go about the college admissions game. she even suggests that the money colleges spend on advertising is getting out of hand. Drawing on examples of how this system fails, such as the demise of Sweet Briar, Delahunty suggests a college matching system which, like programs that match medical students to appropriate residencies, would allow students to list their top schools and then the schools themselves would match students to the ideal program for their interests and abilities. This would replace the urge for students to just apply (and accept application at) the schools with the best rankings.

The piece can be read here.

Do it tonight: Joan Soriano Concert for Hispanic Heritage Month

joan soriano

Joan Soriano will play tonight in Pierce Pub

Starting at 8PM tonight, Peirce Pub will feature Joan Soriano, a renowned bachata musician who has received acclaim from The New York Times, NPR and International Public Radio. His band, La Familia Soriano, and his music are a celebration of both the origins of bachata music and his upbringing. Don’t miss this chance to get your groove on in celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month!

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Kenyon in the (Roaring ’20s) News: Centennial

The New York Times published an article in 1924 celebrating Kenyon’s centennial anniversary, and in typical Kenyon fashion spend more time going on about bizarre and quasi-related things like carpentry than anything actually relevant. Gasp as Philander Chase breaks his ribs (for real) being crushed under “an enormous coach filled with fat passengers!” Sigh as you realize that Kenyon housing hasn’t really improved at all in the last 188 years, nor has its housing policy! Amusingly, this article takes up maybe a quarter of the Times page it’s featured on, while the other 75% is filled by an gigantic advertisement for…women’s rubber girdles, with a main selling point being that they “[don’t] cause you embarrassment because of [their] disagreeable odor.” Excuse me?

Full article after the jump. Continue reading

Kenyon in the Old-Timey News

In the past, we’ve dug up some cool stuff from the Collegian archives, but there’s actually some pretty cool Kenyon-related stuff in The New York Times’ archives too. Now that this editor has discovered how to access them (thanks LBIS!), here’s one of the cool things I found during my random procrastination-browsing. This is the headline from an article dated Nov 26, 1905, concerning the investigation into the famous death of Stuart Pierson and consisting mainly of a statement by President William F. Peirce. (Note that the Times twice misspells Peirce’s name in the first paragraph, even though he signed his statement with the correct spelling.) Full article after the jump.

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The New York Times Loves P. F. Kluge!

Come to Kenyon! Our professors can write! (kenyon.edu)

Today’s New York Times (page C4, for you print edition fans) features a book review of  The Master Blaster, the lastest novel by prolific Kenyon author and cigar smoker P.F. Kluge. They loved it! Central to the novel is the island of Saipan in the western Pacific, which Kluge has visited many times. Saipan is a U.S. slave labor camp Commonwealth, which allows for the possibility of all sorts of nefarious things like cheap labor and low trade tariffs.

The novel is about a group who come to the island knowing little about it, or each other. Throughout the book, “the main characters explore the island and one another.” The Times also describes The Master Blaster as a “bewitching love letter to an utterly maddening place” and “tinged with thoughts of mortality.” Kluge’s voice, familiar to anyone who has taken one of his popular seminars (or anyone on the Collegian staff) is “seasoned, amused and vibrant.”

For any Kenyon students interested in learning more about the book, Kluge is having a lecture and discussion about it at the Bookstore this Thursday, from 7:30-9:00 p.m.